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Updated 01/14/2008

Remembering 25 Years Ago—September 1981

(en Español)


Sept. 5

Oscar Alexis Colindres, a Honduran university student, disappears after being detained in Tegucigalpa by members of the Transit Police.  

Source

“Honduras: The Facts Speak for Themselves.” The Preliminary Report of the National Commissioner for the Protection of Human Rights in Honduras. Human Rights Watch; July 1994 


Sept. 8

Jose Mario Martínez, a Salvadoran, and Julio Diaz Ruiz and Tomas Vijil, both Hondurans, disappear after being detained in Tegucigalpa, allegedly by agents of the DNI. 

Source

“Honduras: The Facts Speak for Themselves.” The Preliminary Report of the National Commissioner for the Protection of Human Rights in Honduras. Human Rights Watch; July 1994 


Sept. 12 

Manfredo Velásquez, a 35-year-old graduate student, teacher, father and leader of a socialist national student union, is abducted off a street in downtown Tegucigalpa, allegedly by six agents of the DNI. Eyewitnesses see him being pushed into a car that drives off. A few days after his abduction, his family, led by sister Zenaida Velásquez, files a petition against the public security forces. 

On Oct. 7 the Velásquez family submits a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights against the state of Honduras for the forced disappearance of Manfredo Velásquez. Their case is ultimately passed on to the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, marking the first time a government had been tried for the crime of disappearance, and in 1988 the court finds Honduras guilty. (For more information, read Manfredo Velásquez’s case history.) 

Sources

“Honduras: The Facts Speak for Themselves.” The Preliminary Report of the National Commissioner for the Protection of Human Rights in Honduras. Human Rights Watch; July 1994 

“Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law.” U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida; Case No. 02-22046-CIV-LENARD/KLEIN. March 31, 2006.  


Sept. 16 

The Velásquez family, Bertha Oliva—wife of Tomás Nativí, who was abducted and disappeared June 11—and other individuals staged a large protest in front of the Honduran National Congress in Tegucigalpa to demand justice from the Honduran authorities. 

Source

MISF interview with Bertha Oliva; June 26, 2006 


Sept. 19 

Antonio Zuñiga, a Honduran, disappears after being detained in Danlí, Department of El Paraíso.


Source

“Honduras: The Facts Speak for Themselves.” The Preliminary Report of the National Commissioner for the Protection of Human Rights in Honduras. Human Rights Watch; July 1994 


Sept. 24 

As many as 60,000 Hondurans hold a demonstration in Tegucigalpa to protest repression by government security forces. Organizers say that dozens of left-wing activists have been abducted in recent weeks and accuse the police of being behind it. 

Marco Virgilio Carias, head of the Honduran Socialist Party, holds a press conference announcing his release after 10 days of torture, and accuses the Honduran military and police for giving the green light to “death squads.” 

Source

“60,000 Hondurans Protest ‘Repression.’” New York Times; Sept. 25, 1981 


Sept. 29 

U.S. President Ronald Reagan announces his intention to nominate John D. Negroponte to replace Jack R. Binns as U.S. Ambassador to Honduras. The move will bring Ambassador Binns’ term in Honduras to a premature end. 

Source

Public Papers of Ronald Reagan, Ronald Reagan Presidential Library