DonateNow
Stay tuned for something new!
In the coming months, MISF Media will launch a redesigned website. In the meantime, continue to check here for new editions of the "Honduras News in Review" and "Remembering 25 Years Ago" features.
Human Rights
in the Global Community
Overview
Global Bodies & Treaties
Current Issues
Human Rights–War on Terror News Update
Human Rights in Honduras
Overview
History
Current Issues
Honduras News in Review
Remembering 25 Years Ago
Search the Site:
Updated 10/21/2005

Honduras News in Review—October 21, 2005

1. Hunger strikers demand farmland back from businessmen

2. UN Population Fund report shows maternal mortality down in Honduras

3. Honduras among most corrupt countries, but showing improvement

4. Americas an increasingly dangerous place for trade unionists, according to survey 


 

1. Hunger strikers demand farmland back from businessmen

A group of rural farmers from the department of Colón have been staging a hunger strike in front of the National Congress building in Tegucigalpa since Oct. 17. The farmers are demanding the return of 25,000 hectares of land they say was illegally taken from them by businessmen. The group claims that the current landowners used tricks such as bribing local officials in order to secure legal paperwork for the land. Although the landowners claim that the land had been abandoned, protestors contend the land had been actively worked by cooperatives for over 30 years. [Hondudiario, 10/17/05] 


2. UN Population Fund report shows maternal mortality down in Honduras

The United Nations Population Fund has released its report, “State of World Population 2005.” The report shows some improvement in Honduran health indices, including a 37% reduction in the maternal mortality rate between 1990 and 1997 and a 33% increase in qualified midwives and other health professionals in rural areas. However, 44% of births in Honduras are still unattended by health professionals. The report also indicates a significant increase in the number of women living with HIV/AIDS in Honduras. Gender violence persists in Honduras, where every sixth woman above the age of 14 has been a victim of physical violence. However, Honduras also has one of the most progressive domestic violence laws among developing countries. [Hondudiario, 10/18/05; UN Population Fund report]
 

3. Honduras among most world’s corrupt countries, but showing improvement

The nongovernmental organization Transparency International on Oct. 18 released its annual Corruption Perceptions Index, which places Honduras among the most corrupt countries in the world. Of 159 countries surveyed, more than two thirds scored below 5 on an index of 1 (most corrupt) to 10 (least corrupt). Of those, 70 countries scored 3 or less, including Honduras, which scored 2.6 on the corruption index. That score, however, is an increase from 2.3 in 2004, and raises Honduras’ rank on the corruption list from 116 to 107. [Hondudiario, 10/18/05; Diario La Prensa, 10/19/05; Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2005]


4. Americas an increasingly dangerous place for trade unionists, according to survey

The International Confederation of Free Trade Unions’ annual worldwide Survey of Violations of Trade Union Rights revealed that murders and death threats against trade unionists are on the rise in the Americas. According to the survey, published Oct. 18, 114 trade unionists were killed during the year, an increase from 94 deaths in 2003. In addition, 456 unionists in the region received death threats, 120 suffered torture, 200 were arrested, and over 1,000 were arbitrarily dismissed. Colombia had by far the highest rates of murder and death threats, while Central America and Mexico had the highest incidence of worker abuse. [EFE News, 10/19/05; ICFTU annual survey]


SUBSCRIBE to the Honduras News in Review E-MAIL UPDATE!